Pothos longipes (Araceae)

Pothos

A long yearning? That’s what the name Pothos longipes seems to suggest. In Greek mythology, the character Pothos was part of Aphrodite’s attendants, and carried a vine, indicating a connection to wine or the god Dionysus. And “longipes” denote long-footed.

Pothos longipes is one of the most easily identified plants in the Wet Tropics – it’s common name Candle Vine should be a hint.

The leaves have a strange look – like that of a candle. The “flame” part is actually the main part of the leaf, while the long part is a petiole (leaf stalk) that is flattened out with leafy tisue.

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This common root climber is a relative of the Philodendron or climbing aroids, and are seen climbing up rainforest trees, often with free hanging stems.

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The ripe fruits are edible and Guyu is the name of this plant in the Ngadjon language of indigenous people from North Queensland (based on the glossary of Bob Dixon)

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Far North Queensland has one other species of Pothos, Pothos brassii, which is a much rarer endemic plant in wetter rainforests.

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About David Tng

I am David Tng, a hedonistic botanizer who pursues plants with a fervour. I chase the opportunity to delve into various aspects of the study of plants. I have spent untold hours staring at mosses and allied plants, taking picture of pollen, culturing orchids in clean cabinets, counting tree rings, monitoring plant flowering times, etc. I am currently engrossed in the study of plant ecology (a grand excuse to see 'anything I can). Sometimes I think of myself as a shadow taxonomist, a sentimental ecologist, and a spiritual environmentalist - but at the very root of it all, a "plant whisperer"!
This entry was posted in Araceae (Aroid family), Edible plants, Habitat - Rain forest, Lifeform - Climbers, Lifeform - Epiphytes and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

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