Dysoxylum gaudichaudianum (Meliaceae)

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This native species of mahogany is known as the Ivory Mahogany, and it has one of the largest leaves (in terms of length) of the native mahoganies. They can be readily distinguished by the size of the compound leaf and the very conspicuously uneven bases.

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“Hairy armpits” at the nerve-midrib intersection

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Sapling leaves reach close to 2m in length.

Posted in Habitat - Rain forest, Lifeform - Trees & Shrubs, Meliaceae (Mahogany family) | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

Dysoxylum pettigrewianum (Meliaceae)

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This huge tree is also known as the Spur Mahogany, because of the large buttrees shaped as spurs that form at the base of the trunk. Another feature is that the leaf rachis is shallowly winged to the first pair of leaflets.

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Fruits

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Leaflet underside

Posted in Habitat - Rain forest, Lifeform - Trees & Shrubs, Meliaceae (Mahogany family) | Tagged , , , | 1 Comment

Dysoxylum alliaceum (Meliaceae)

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The leaves of D. alliaceum often do not have a terminal leaflet. When browken, the twigs have a somewhat garlic-like or onion-like smell.

Dysoxylum alliaceum

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Posted in Habitat - Rain forest, Lifeform - Trees & Shrubs, Meliaceae (Mahogany family) | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

Dysoxylum parasiticum (Meliaceae)

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Dysoxylum parasiticum or Yellow Mahogany can be distinguished by the hairy leaflets (particularly on the leaflet underside), and especially the rusty pores (lenticels) on the twigs and leaf rachis.

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Rusty pores (lenticels) on the twigs and leaf rachis.

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Leaflets

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Dysoxylum papuanum (Meliaceae)

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Dysoxylum papuanum, the Spice Mahogany, is probably the easiest among the Dysoxylums to recognize. Leaflets are somewhat light green and thinner than the other Dysoxylums.

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Underside of leaflets

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Underside of leaflets and the terminal leaflet

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Backhousia enata (Myrtaceae)

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This beautiful endemic Backhousia looks seems to be distinguished by the hairy leaves, stems and especially the large sepals relative to petals.

Posted in Habitat - Rain forest, Lifeform - Trees & Shrubs, Myrtaceae (Myrtle family), Ornamental Plants | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

Xanthostemon youngii (Myrtaceae)

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I would so love to see this amazingly ornamental species, the aptly naamed Crimson Penda, in its native habitat in the beach forests of Cape York.

But I am not complaining at the privilege to encounter this beauty at the carpark outside the Australian Tropical Herbarium.

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As with all the Xanthostemons I know, this species has alternate leaves. The leaves have a somewhat narrow obovate shape and are slightly leathery.

Posted in Endemics, Habitat - Coastal forest, Lifeform - Trees & Shrubs, Myrtaceae (Myrtle family), Ornamental Plants | Tagged , , | Leave a comment