Ficus pleurocarpa (Moraceae)

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This endemic strangling fig tree, very descriptively named the banana fig, is one of FNQ’s more beautiful fig trees. The large and elongated (~5cm long) figs ripen into a nice dark red, and when you bite into one of them, the first thought that might occur to you is…”substantial”. Relatively tasty bush tucker as well, a far as wild figs go. The figs also arise in pairs per leaf axil – good things come in twos don’t they.

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The leaves are largish and have a beautiful bronze underside, and tri-nerved venation at the leaf base. Combined with the hairy stems, angled stipular scars and the long stipule, this native fig is quite distinctive.

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While they are strangler figs by nature, they seem to do just fine as stand-alone ornamental trees.

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Posted in Edible plants, Endemics, Lifeform - Trees & Shrubs, Moraceae (Fig family), Ornamental Plants, Traditional Plant Use | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

Dysoxylum latifolium (Meliaceae)

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This native mahogany tree is not a particularly well known species, or at least it must be considered so dreary as to not deserve a common name.

In some respects, this species looks more like a member of the Sapindaceae due to it’s alternate leaflets and even a ‘leaflet extension spine’, making it one of those species that you’d probably ‘know when you know’. The leaflets are somewhat glossy green on the underside and a only bit lighter in shade compared to the upperside. The midrib is raised on top.

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The flowers some rather few. More on this when I espy some fruits

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Leaflet underside

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Leaf stalks swollen at point of attachment to stem

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Dysoxylum gaudichaudianum (Meliaceae)

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This native species of mahogany is known as the Ivory Mahogany, and it has one of the largest leaves (in terms of length) of the native mahoganies. They can be readily distinguished by the size of the compound leaf and the very conspicuously uneven bases.

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“Hairy armpits” at the nerve-midrib intersection

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Sapling leaves reach close to 2m in length.

Posted in Habitat - Rain forest, Lifeform - Trees & Shrubs, Meliaceae (Mahogany family) | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

Dysoxylum pettigrewianum (Meliaceae)

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This huge tree is also known as the Spur Mahogany, because of the large buttrees shaped as spurs that form at the base of the trunk. Another feature is that the leaf rachis is shallowly winged to the first pair of leaflets.

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Fruits

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Leaflet underside

Posted in Habitat - Rain forest, Lifeform - Trees & Shrubs, Meliaceae (Mahogany family) | Tagged , , , | 1 Comment

Dysoxylum alliaceum (Meliaceae)

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The leaves of D. alliaceum often do not have a terminal leaflet. When browken, the twigs have a somewhat garlic-like or onion-like smell.

Dysoxylum alliaceum

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Posted in Habitat - Rain forest, Lifeform - Trees & Shrubs, Meliaceae (Mahogany family) | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

Dysoxylum parasiticum (Meliaceae)

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Dysoxylum parasiticum or Yellow Mahogany can be distinguished by the hairy leaflets (particularly on the leaflet underside), and especially the rusty pores (lenticels) on the twigs and leaf rachis.

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Rusty pores (lenticels) on the twigs and leaf rachis.

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Leaflets

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Dysoxylum papuanum (Meliaceae)

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Dysoxylum papuanum, the Spice Mahogany, is probably the easiest among the Dysoxylums to recognize. Leaflets are somewhat light green and thinner than the other Dysoxylums.

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Underside of leaflets

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Underside of leaflets and the terminal leaflet

Posted in Habitat - Rain forest, Lifeform - Trees & Shrubs, Meliaceae (Mahogany family) | Tagged , , | Leave a comment