Ficus pumila (Moraceae)

Ficus pumila

The Creeping fig is probably one of the most well-known ornamental fig plants, and is seen in many tropical countries as an ornamental climber, not just for the home but also in urban settings, where it is used to decorate (sometimes not intentionally) overhead road crossings or other urban structures.

As a kid I found Ficus pumila to be a very interesting plant, because it has leaves of two forms. The smaller leaves are adpressed to the substrate (and I tend to think that they climb walls better than trees), and then when it is ready to fruit, it bears them on branches which come off and hang free from the wall, and on these branches are the large fruits.

I have never tried the fruits of F. pumila but there are varieties of this species, Ficus pumila var. awkeotsang or the Awkeotsang Creeping Fig, which is known specially for the edible figs. The figs of this subspecies are used to make a ice jelly desert in Asian countries.

Advertisements

About David Tng

I am David Tng, a hedonistic botanizer who pursues plants with a fervour. I chase the opportunity to delve into various aspects of the study of plants. I have spent untold hours staring at mosses and allied plants, taking picture of pollen, culturing orchids in clean cabinets, counting tree rings, monitoring plant flowering times, etc. I am currently engrossed in the study of plant ecology (a grand excuse to see 'anything I can). Sometimes I think of myself as a shadow taxonomist, a sentimental ecologist, and a spiritual environmentalist - but at the very root of it all, a "plant whisperer"!
This entry was posted in Edible plants, Habitat - Urban Areas, Lifeform - Climbers, Moraceae (Fig family), Ornamental Plants and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s